/Trump campaign calls itself the Death Star; Biden team notes it gets blown up

Trump campaign calls itself the Death Star; Biden team notes it gets blown up

WASHINGTON – Donald Trump’s re-election campaign is comparing itself to a famous “Star Wars” space station, the Death Star – the weapons facility that is blown up at the end of at the end of the 1977 epic.

“For nearly three years we have been building a juggernaut campaign (Death Star).” tweeted Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale. “It is firing on all cylinders. Data, Digital, TV, Political, Surrogates, Coalitions, etc. In a few days we start pressing FIRE for the first time.”

It didn’t take long for the campaign of presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden to respond with a tweet showing the scene in which rebel Luke Skywalker destroys the Death Star.

“11/3/20,” tweeted Biden aide Andrew Bates, a reference to the date of Election Day.

The Star Wars political battle lit up Twitter.

David Rothkopf, an anti-Trump commentator, cited the coronavirus pandemic in telling Parscale “you should have considered the term ‘Death Star’ a little more carefully-what with the 100,000 or more people who are likely to die because of your candidate’s failed leadership.”

Parscale, who also spent Thursday tweeting out anti-Biden ads, said reporters gave him the idea, and he is happy to oblige.

“I didn’t give our campaign the name, Death Star, the media did,” he tweeted in a follow-up. “However, I am happy to use the analogy. The fact is, we haven’t used it yet. Laugh all you want, we will take the win!”

Brad Parscale

The back-and-forth comes three days after “Star Wars Day,” as proclaimed by the many fans of the film series. The symbolic holiday is always May 4 – as in, “may the Force be with you.”

This is far from the first time that Star Wars themes have been applied to politics.

For years, critics dubbed Vice President Dick Cheney “Darth Vader,” an identity Cheney happily claimed for himself.

Some analysts said there may be method to movie madness – after all, a lot of people talked about Parscale’s tweet.

Tommy Vietor, a national security spokesman for President Barack Obama, tweeted: “Hey maybe Brad Parscale knows how Star Wars ends and he knows that a million WELL ACTUALLY tweets drives up engagement and virality of content.”